On Fridays, we bring you the best of our blog and the best of the web. This week’s roundup includes the wisdom of Henry Hazlitt, a lesson from “Chariots of Fire,” post-election commentary and more.

1. Henry Hazlitt’s Lessons for a Life of Liberty: Isaac Morehouse reflects on the valuable lessons that we can learn from the life and words of Henry Hazlitt.

This is perhaps the best insight into how Hazlitt saw the world—no matter how far off current policies are from freedom and economic progress, so long as there are open and inquiring minds, the truth of sound market principles has a chance, and if given a try, will prevail.

2. What Race Are You Running?: Hugh Whelchel uses the story of Eric Liddell to remind us that our calling to work is a life-long pursuit that transforms every area of our lives.

We believe that if Christians do this [live out a biblical theology that integrates faith, work, and economics], the result will be a more free society characterized by greater creativity and increased human flourishing. We acknowledged that the work needed to achieve this mission won’t be finished overnight. That’s why we need to take a long-term view.

3. The battle for free enterprise and limited government is a long-term fight: Arthur Brooks addresses the challenges that will face America in the coming years, and how those challenges can be overcome without sacrificing our values.

We have to begin this year to fix our unbalanced entitlements, enact a pro-growth economic agenda, and get spending in check. This will require overcoming gridlock, which means compromise on policy. But never on values. That’s the long-term battle facing America. And that’s the battle that we must recommit to today.

4. Eternal Hope in a King: T. Kurt Jaros takes a step back from the hectic post-election commentary to refocus on our enduring hope in Christ.

We just concluded months—or years, actually—of “your party vs. my party” politics. So I wanted to take this moment to remind my fellow YHWH worshippers that although we have temporal party affiliations, there is a certain political affiliation that is eternal: We are monarchists.

5. Becoming European: Jonah Goldberg observes how the most recent election shows Americans endorsing the European version of the state.

The distinction between the two worldviews is mostly a disagreement over first assumptions about which institutions should take the lead in our lives. It is an argument about what the habits of the American heart should be. Should we live in a country where the first recourse is to appeal to the government, or should government interventions be reserved as a last resort?